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Sports Betting As A Business Since 1997.                                             Click HERE for Home Page & Index

 

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In a nutshell:
With sports betting you don't wait for weeks or months to know if your investment was successful. You get an answer in about three hours.
 

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J.V. Miller is widely recognized as one of the world’s top sports handicappers.

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Could YOU be a Professional Gambler?

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The Best Way to Gamble

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A Crash Course in Vigorish

 

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Debunking the Kelly Criterion

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How to Beat NFL Preseason

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 Winning Percentages of Pro Gamblers

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All About NFL Pointspreads

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Moneyline Conversion Chart

 

 © All material on this site is protected by United States copyright laws. All rights reserved. Written permission must be secured from the publisher to use or reproduce any part of this material. "ProfessionalGambler.com" is a registered trademark of J. V. Miller dba Flying M Group, email@professionalgambler.com, PO Box 68, Readyville, TN 37149. This is a SECURE site. Use your credit card with confidence at our ORDER Page. We do not tele-market, nor do we sell, trade, rent or otherwise reveal customers' identities to anyone! DISCLAIMER:  This material is intended for informational purposes only and not to be construed as an inducement to gamble. You must be 21 years of age to use this site. Any use of this information in violation of any federal, state and local laws is prohibited. If you think you have a gambling problem click HERE to visit the Gamblers Anonymous website. Parkinson’s drugs encourage gambling.

COULD YOU BE A PROFESSIONAL GAMBLER?

It’s the best job in the world if you’ve got what it takes.

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It’s not easy, but you can make a living betting sports. 

Imagine investing in the stock market, only in very, very fast motion. Sports betting, after all, can be likened to financial markets, except the sports betting financial market is demonstrated to be more inefficient (this is good). Generally speaking, professional bettors do not consider themselves gamblers at all, but rather investors.

Successful sports bettors appear to be pretty much like anyone else. Most are married, have children, a mortgage, a car loan, a lawn mower, and all the other accouterments of 'normal' people. The difference is, they absolutely love what they do for a living. Although they generally put in a lot of hours, they are their own boss. They can pick their own hours and their own work environment

As a successful sports bettor you have no time clock, no boss, no 'customers', no daily commute battling traffic - none of the hassles of most everyone else you know. You can work from home and 'home' can be anywhere you choose. You can work from Mexico City, or New York, or Moosebreath, North Dakota - or anywhere between. You can spend the day in swimming trunks or tuxedoes or in nothing at all, - and you have plenty of time for your favorite hobbies or other pursuits.

As mentioned above, sports betting has many of the characteristics of investing in commodities or stocks, - but without  some of the disadvantages concerning insider trading, Martha Stewart-style scandals, overpriced broker fees and a general feeling of not being in control of your own destiny. In the stock market you're pitting your expertise against world-class experts and corporate insiders who get most news a long time before you do. On the other hand, with this weekend's sports games, you're pitting your expertise against the average sports bettor. It is self-evident who is easier to outthink, the full-time stock market player or the average sports bettor.

The average sports bettor is amazingly uninformed. He bets from intuition and emotion. He does very little actual research. When you consider you figure to win 50% of your plays simply flipping a coin, can it really be all that tough to win more than 53 percent?

No real pro expects easy profit or 70% winners. Yes, I'm afraid it's a lot tougher than it looks, and combined with the hazards of faulty money management, sports betting is a very slippery slope. The far majority of sports bettors make sports betting their sole vocation. Another big difference between sports betting and gambling on stocks or commodities is, of course, that in sports betting you have no chance of making or losing 5%-10%-20% of whatever you risk on a particular "stock." You figure to either lose 100% of your investment in that "stock" or make 91% on your investment...And, of course, with sports betting you don't wait for weeks or months to know if your investment was successful. You get an answer in about three hours. Consequently, you can turn over your total bankroll much more quickly, and your investment remains much more liquid. Typically, a full-time professional sports bettor can have up to 2,000 opinions per year and an "edge" (an expectation of winning) of between 54% and 58% of those bets wherein he must risk 11 to win ten.

At 55%, 2,000 plays in a year is 1100 winners and 900 losers. At those figures, his gross profit would be over 100 betting units. If his bet size is 1 percent of his beginning bankroll, and even if he does not increase the size of his bets as his bankroll increases, he makes 100 percent profit on his original investment every year. Risking 2 percent of his original bankroll, he figures to make 200 percent profit per year. Changing his bet size when his bankroll increases (or decreases) by 50%, he can make much more. Compare that to investing in stocks or bonds, which pale by comparison.

...And all it takes is to call at least 54% winners against pointspreads and totals, - and, of course, to properly manage your bankroll.

That's what this web site and this material is all about. Take a look at the Order Page. The 'how-to' materials available there are by the most respected sports handicappers in the business. What you can learn from these men can be every bit as valuable as the best college education.

I don't mean to make sports betting sound like an easy way to get rich, and I want to make it clear that the vast majority of people reading this sentence should NOT consider sports betting (or serious gambling in any fashion) as a serious avocation. There seems to be a million ways to fail. For one thing, probably the most important of all things, you should be as objective as possible when considering your own psychological qualifications. Sports betting should be addressed as a business; not as some sort of amusement park thrill ride. Be sure to read the articles on this website concerning money management and the differences between genuine pros and the phonies that stalk the Internet.